40900 Global History and Geography I 1 credit -

YEAR ONE

40900 Global History and Geography I 1 credit - This course is designed to focus on the common themes that recur across time and place and eight historical eras. This is the first part of a two-year sequence which focuses on a chronological study of 1) Ancient World: Civilizations and Religion (4000 BC–500 AD); 2) Expanding Zones of Exchange and Encounter (500-1200); 3) Global Interactions (1200-1650); and 4) the First Global Age (1450-1770). The course is designed to show interdependence and to create in students a greater awareness of the world using the new NYS Social Studies Frameworks.

40902 AP World History I Honors(5% weight) 1 credit - This honors course focuses on the same themes as the 40900 course but stresses the development of higher-order cognitive skills through the use of more challenging questions, more in-depth study of topics, the use of more complete and difficult primary sources, and more challenging classroom examinations to prepare students for AP World History II. In addition, students are expected to do more in-depth study of topics, the use of more complete and difficult primary sources, more challenging classroom examinations and independent study. An 8th grade four quarter average of 85 or better in Social Studies is needed to be recommended for this course.

 

YEAR TWO

41000 Global History II 1 credit - This course is designed to focus on the common themes that recur across time and place and eight historical eras. This is the second part of a two-year sequence which focuses on a chronological study of 1) an age of revolutions (1750-1914); 2) a half-century of crisis and achievement (1900-1945); and 3) global connections and interactions. The course is designed to create in students a greater awareness of the world in which they live. It will conclude with a Regents Examination encompassing material from Global History and Geography I and II. An ESL/SIOP Coach may be present to assist ESL students and the teacher.

41002 Global History II Honors (5% weight) 1 credit - This honors course focuses on the same themes as the 40900 course but stresses the development of higher-order cognitive skills through the use of more challenging questions, more in-depth study of topics, the use of more complete and difficult questions, and more challenging classroom examinations. In addition, students are expected to do more in- depth study of topics, the use of more complete and difficult primary sources, more challenging classroom examinations and independent study. This course will conclude with a Regents examination encompassing material from Global History and Geography II. An 9th grade four quarter average of 85 or better in Global I is needed to be recommended for this course.

41001 AP World History I (10% weight) 1 credit - This course highlights six overarching themes that correspond to the NYS Social Studies Framework for Global History and Geography. This course will conclude with a Regents examination encompassing material from Global History and Geography II. Students are also required to take the Advanced Placement World History Examination prepared by the College Entrance Examination Board and pay the College Board fee. College credit is based upon the Advanced Placement examination score and the policy of the college. (Prerequisite: Final Grade of 85+ in 40902 AP World History I)

 

YEAR THREE

41100 United States History/Govt 1 credit - This chronologically organized course emphasizes the United States as an industrial nation. Topics include (1) The Constitutional Foundations for the Democratic Republic; (2) Nationalism and Sectionalism; (3) Industrialization of the United States; (4) The Progressive Movement; (5) Prosperity and Depression (1917-1940); (6) The U.S. in an Age of Global Crisis (1941-1950); (7) The U.S. and the World since 1950.This course will conclude with the U.S. History and Government Regents examination. An ESL/SIOP Coach may be present to assist ESL students and the teacher.

41102 United States History/Govt Honors (5% weight) 1 credit - This chronologically organized course emphasizes the United States as an industrial nation. Topics include (1) The Constitutional Foundations for the Democratic Republic; (2) Nationalism and Sectionalism; (3) Industrialization of the United States; (4) The Progressive Movement; (5) Prosperity and Depression (1917-1940); (6) The U.S. in an Age of Global Crisis (1941-1950); (7) The U.S. and the World since 1950.Within the honors level course, the program is designed to stress the development of higher-order cognitive skills through the use of more in-depth study of topics and the use of more challenging primary sources. In addition, students are expected to take more challenging classroom examinations and do more independent study. This course will conclude with the U.S. History and Government Regents Examination. An 10th grade four quarter average of 85 or better in Global II is needed to be recommended for this course.

41101 Advanced Placement United States History and Government (10% weight) 1 credit - This is a college level course covering the period from colonial times to 1886 in the first semester, and the period from 1886 to the present in the second semester. Students are required to take the AP United States History Examination prepared by the College Board. College credit is based upon Advanced Placement Examination score and the desired college. The final examination for the course is the Regents Exam in U.S. History and Government.

 

YEAR FOUR

41210 Economics 1⁄2 credit - This course deals with the basic principles that help explain the operation of our economy, money, and banking, business organization, and the stock market.

41212 Economics H (5% weight) 1⁄2 credit - This course deals with the basic principles that help explain the operation of our economy, money, and banking, business organization and the stock market. As an honors level course, the program is designed to emphasize the development of higher-order cognitive skills through the use of more challenging questions and activities, more in- depth study of topics, the use of more challenging source material, and more challenging classroom examinations.

41231 Advanced Placement Microeconomics (10% weight) 1⁄2 credit - This course is designed to expose students to the circumstances and challenges surrounding a national economy. It introduces the concepts of fiscal policy, monetary policy and international trade policy and their impact on unemployment, inflation, aggregate markets, and the value of the dollar. Particular attention is paid to policy analysis and the role of the individual in the macro-economy. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Macroeconomics Examination and pay the College Board fee. College credit is based upon the Advanced Placement examination score and the specific policy of each college.

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41241 Advanced Placement Macroeconomics (10% weight) 1⁄2 credit

This course is designed to expose students to the circumstances and challenges surrounding a national economy. It introduces the concepts of inflation, unemployment, aggregate markets, fiscal policy, monetary policy, economic growth and international economics. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Macroeconomics Examination and pay the College Board fee. College credit is based upon the Advanced Placement examination score and the specific policy of each college.

41213 Economics – Project Advance (10% weight) (Ramapo High School Only) 1⁄2 credit

This analysis of a market oriented economy deals both with the microeconomic and macroeconomic levels. There is a strong emphasis on personal choice and interpreting current news events from an economic perspective. This course affords the opportunity to earn college credits from Syracuse University.

41220 Participation in Government 1⁄2 credit This course is designed to encourage the development of civic-minded individuals. Students study the structure of our government, analyze contemporary governmental issues and problems and via debates and research, formulate possible solutions.

41223 Public Affairs – Project Advance (10% weight) 1⁄2 credit This college-level political science course given under the auspices of Syracuse University is designed to introduce students to the basic skills of public policy analysis. Students identify various social problems and research the various governmental agencies that deal with these problems. They learn the tools of statistical analysis, create questionnaires and surveys, and do feasibility studies and proposal writing related to these issues. Students make extensive use of newspapers and the Internet, must attend community meetings and perform at least five hours of community service. This course affords the opportunity to earn college credits from Syracuse University. Only seniors may use this class to fulfill their Participation in Government requirement.

41221 Advanced Placement United States Government and Politics (10% weight) 1 credit

This course will give students an analytical perspective on general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies. The course covers the constitutional underpinnings of U.S. government, political beliefs and behaviors, political parties, interest groups, mass media, institutions of national government, public policy, civil rights and civil liberties. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement US Govt and Politics Examination and pay the College Board fee. This exam is administered in May; after-school refresher sessions will be provided in the spring. College credit is based upon the Advanced Placement examination score and the specific policy of each college.

 

High School Social Studies Electives

42130 Contemporary Affairs 1⁄2 credit This one-semester elective is designed to enable students to gain certain basic understandings about our contemporary world. Some of the topics covered are 1) crime and punishment in our society; 2) a study of diversity in our society; 3) the problems of marriage and family in our society; 4) the problems of aging; 5) alcoholism and drug abuse; 6) teenage suicide; 7) gun control; 8) animal rights; 9) terrorism; 10) criminal and civil law.

 

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42210 Psychology 1⁄2 credit - This one-semester elective introduces students to several topics in the field of psychology, including personality development, abnormal behavior, sleep and dreams, and dealing with problems. This course deals with a study of topics such as learning, personality, mental illness, hypnosis and dream analysis. Simulated behavior modification methods will be used where feasible.

42231 Advanced Placement Psychology 1 credit - This is a full-year, college-level course that covers eighteen units, including the biology of behavior, thought and language, and stress and emotions. Psychology is not a prerequisite for AP Psychology. This course is available to seniors and qualified juniors. Students are required to take the Advanced Placement Psychology Examination and pay the College Board fee. This exam is administered in May; after-school refresher sessions will be provided in the spring. College credit is based upon the Advanced Placement examination score and the specific policy of each college.

42233 Psychology – Project Advance (10% weight) 1⁄2 credit - This one-semester college-level psychology course is given under the auspices of Syracuse University. It provides a foundation for more advanced study in the subject. This course affords the opportunity to earn college credits from Syracuse University.

42250 Sociology 1⁄2 credit - This one-semester sociology course introduces students to the field by engaging them in discussions and written analysis of current topics. The topics include family, institutions, sports, culture and race relations. Students are expected to carry out fieldwork by the use of cooperative learning groups, technology and face-to-face interviews.

42253 Sociology – Project Advance (10% weight) 1⁄2 credit - This one-semester, college-level sociology course, given under the auspices of Syracuse University, is designed to introduce students to the professional field. The course uses professional journals in the area of sociology to cover such topics as identity, marginality, transgenderism, post-modernism, the media and multiculturalism. Students are moved to high level thinking by provocative discussions and in-depth analysis of professional articles. Field projects and written analysis are required through the use of cooperative learning groups, technology and face-to-face interviews. This course affords the opportunity to earn college credits from Syracuse University.

42340 Constitutional Law 1⁄2 credit - Students examine our protections under the Bill of Rights, study major Supreme Court decisions and current constitutional issues and their impact on our lives. Students develop the skills of legal analysis and engage in mock trials.

42350 American Justice System 1⁄2 credit - This one-semester course examines aspects of constitutional, criminal and civil law. Rights, due process of law and legal system structure are included. Mock court trials and field trips will be included.

42370 Criminal Justice 1⁄2 credit - This course offers students the opportunity to study, observe and participate in the American Criminal Justice system. Students study significant cases, listen to guest lecturers such as District Attorneys, lawyers and Judges, and participate in Mock Trials to gain experience in the field of law. Through this course students will learn of their rights and responsibilities in our society.

42410 African-American Studies 1⁄2 credit - This course emphasizes the African-American struggle against persecution, oppression and injustice, and achievements and contributions of African-Americans to American life. Contemporary issues (affirmative action, the family, education) are discussed as well. Students must complete a research project related to the African-American experience.

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42500 Model Congress 1⁄2 credit - This course offers students a chance to learn about the legislative process of the United States using a “hands-on” approach. Students select an aspect of our society which they believe can be improved by legislation, then research the problem, write original legislation and prepare to debate and defend their ideas. Students are also offered the opportunity to attend Model Congress Conferences sponsored by other high schools and by major universities. Only seniors may use this course to fulfill the Participation in Government requirement.

42263 College Learning Strategies 1⁄2 credit - This one-semester course, involves the study and application of strategic approaches to learning. In preparation for the rigor of college study, students will learn to apply learning strategies in their current courses and analyze which work best for them.

41224 - College Participation in Government - RCC ½ Credit (3 RCC Credits) - An examination of the structures and functions of American national government and the diversity of forces (past and present) that have shaped them. The role of state, regional, county, and local governments in the federal system, with special emphasis on the government and politics of New York State and local communities will be analyzed. State and local governments are discussed in the context of federalism, the state and local roles of executive, judicial and legislative systems, issues in public policy and analysis, and the role of interest groups, local political issues, and participation in community politics. Selected local and state elected officials are invited as guest lecturers during each semester.

41244 - College Economics - RCC ½ Credit (3 RCC Credits) - This course examines the economy and its interaction with the environment. Students examine the use of economic tools in developing new environmental approaches and policies. This course also analyzes the structure and function of the market system, emphasizing the role of supply and demand, the individual firm, the four firm structures, and the distribution of income.

42214 - College Psychology - ½ Credit (3 Credits RCC) - Introduction to the science of psychology, including historical perspectives, methods of research, contemporary theory, knowledge, social psychology, the biological basis of behavior, emotion and motivation, learning and condition, human development, personality, abnormal behavior and perception. In addition, the impact of culture, gender and ethnicity on all of the above are studied.

42254 - Sociology - RCC ½ Credit (3 Credits RCC) - Students will develop a "sociological lens" as they explore major concepts and research methods in sociology. The course examines macro- and micro-sociological perspectives, how culture influences us, socialization and social change. There is particular emphasis on social inequality in relationship to race, ethnicity, sex, gender, and age as well as analysis of the five basic institutions in our society - family, religion, education, politics and the economy.

42374 - Criminal Justice RCC ½ Credit (3 Credits RCC) - The objective of this course is to provide the student with the necessary foundational knowledge of the three main components of the Criminal Justice system: Police, Courts and Corrections. The student will be exposed to the basics in each area upon which other criminal justice courses build. This is a core course within the Criminal Justice curriculum.